• Studio Views

  • An Essay by Shoko Aono

    Precious Layers

    What is it that Yukiya Izumita tries to create with clay?

    Through the lamination of numerous layers, resembling burnt newspaper, Izumita creates fantastic figures. Their texture is like rusted iron, conjuring images of ancient, petrified wood. While difficult to comprehend, these forms warm our hearts, and if we look at them closely, they appear to emit pleasant, silent vibrations that then start to expand. They encompass gravity and weightlessness, balance and imbalance, strength and weakness, void and solidity, but above all; they embody Izumita's experiments in discovering the connection between himself and the world.


    'I exist through my connection with the clay,' he says. 'When I concentrate on this connection, I become free. When I confront the clay, everything is in a state of chaos, but as I discover a good rhythm between myself and the clay, new works are born. My work consists of becoming aware of this rhythm.'
    For Izumita, pottery comprises a physical dialogue between the material of the clay and the attraction he feels towards the scenery he wants to see. How can harmony be found within friction? How can ethereality be found within the heavy clay? How can darkness be turned into light? The genesis of Izumita's work may be said to be human love.


    His first exhibition in New York was held in 2013, after the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake/Tsunami, and his works possessed the earth's heat. This, his fourth exhibition, displays the wisdom that has resulted from facing the pandemic. The pieces seem to indicate the courage that comes of surmounting loads too great to bear and discovering the beauty within chaos. We hope this exhibition can be a celebration: not only of Izumita's works but of the valiant efforts of everybody living today to overcome tragedy and triumph.

     

    Studio Photos by © Shoko Aono

  • Behind the Scenes Video

    Izumita relies on the salt-rich clay of the Iwate prefecture in the Tohuku region of Northeast Japan, known for its harsh weather. Watch Izumita inventively layer bits of clay and fold the muddy Each into a magnificent work of art. Witness how his work reflects the interior and outward journey that led to their creation. 

     

  • Installation images

    Photos by Douglas Dubler
  • Yukiya Izumita's Biography

    Yukiya Izumita's Biography

    Ceramicist Yukiya Izumita began his career training under Gakuho Shimodake in Kokuji- Ware in 1992. Afterwards, in 1995, Izumita went on to open his own studio in Noda Village, Iwate Prefecture, on the border of the Northern Ceramic Production area of Aomori Prefecture. Tohoku, in Northeast Japan, is known for its very severe weather, because of this Izumita became inspired by the costal winds and the endurance found in seaside culture.

     

    Izumita’s artistic career was met with extensive acclaim in Japan. Through exhibiting at SOFA New York in 2005, he was met with international acclaim.

     

    In Japan, Izumita is the recipient of numerous accolades such as the Excellence Award at the 20th Biennial Japanese Ceramic Art Exhibition in 2009 and the Grand Prix at the Asahi Ceramic Exhibitions of 2000 and 2002.

  • The 25 ceramic works in the Yukiya Izumita exhibition are in perpetual tension. His inventive use of layered clay is...

    The 25 ceramic works in the Yukiya Izumita exhibition are in perpetual tension. His inventive use of layered clay is as sophisticated as it is attuned to the earth, with the folds of mud suggestive of the toil they require. 

     

    Each work reflects the interior and exterior journey that led to their creation. Izumita relies on the salt-rich clay of the Iwate prefecture in the Tohuku region of Northeast Japan, known for its harsh weather. This coastal enclave is among the most severe in Japan, but because the artist lost his Rikuzentakatahome in the tsunami of 2011, he finds solace in the laborious processes required to produce each piece. Over and over, pound by pound, Izumita carries the sands from outside his windy Noda Village studio, allowing the catharsis of the arduous journey to give way to harmony and insight.

     

    From the white-capped waves of snowy Iwate, the rocky seaside sands give way to yellow-, red-, and black-toned glazes. Trusting the sensory intuition of his hands, Izumita folds the regular, used pieces of paper freely, his spirit transcendent in the motion. He smooths with his hands, embracing only the quiet sound of washi paper spreading across the table as he meditates on his creation. The dry result is a multi-dimensional surface full of possibilities, aligned with the natural landscape of the earth.

  • Artworks

    • Yukiya Izumita Geometric vase, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Geometric vase, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Crack tea bowl, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Crack tea bowl, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Lidded Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Lidded Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Lidded Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Lidded Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Lidded Seksoh , 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Lidded Seksoh , 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh , 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh , 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh , 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh , 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2020 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2020
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh, 2020 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh, 2020
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh Incense Burner, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh Incense Burner, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh Layers, 2017 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh Layers, 2017
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh Layers, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh Layers, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh Layers, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh Layers, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh vase, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh vase, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh vase , 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh vase , 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh vase, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh vase, 2021
      Ceramic
    • Yukiya Izumita Sekisoh vase, 2021 Ceramic
      Yukiya Izumita
      Sekisoh vase, 2021
      Ceramic